I am getting tired of reading nonsense in western media about Shia vs Sunni's for 'thousands' of years!


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ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) Pinned comment
Ayati jan thanx for another 'chuck full of nuggets' submission.

Per religious sectarian history in Islam the ultimate answer would be no and yes.
- No, since the current sectarian conflicts are, to a large extent, a direct result of destabilizing military invasions, and precise works of British soldiers dressed in Arab gear, carrying explosives, more than a few of which were arrested and photographed.
- Yes, in the sense of all the history of Islam and its early tensions, preserved in one form or another up to now. KSA versus IR tensions is more than just a recurring historical tendency.
Caveat here is that Iran and Arabia have had good days before, they could have it again.
Have I ever mentioned "Merchant Capital and Islam"?

Morteza Ravandi in "Social History of Iran," volume 8 or 9, has an account of Shiafication in Tabriz and the 20,000 beheading in the process.

There is also a minor typo on history of the Coup, it say 1952 instead of '53. As usual you also leave out how Mossadegh was not prepared for the coupe and Tudeh ordered by Moscow to back down and retreat. There's an account from Dr. Gholam Hossein Sedighi, Mossadegh's minister of interior, on the day of infamy Mosadegh calls him and asks Sedighi about the mood in the streets, and Sedighi sends his driver for 'reconnaissance!' This was the level of preparedness from the good doctor.
Good doctors actually.
Dr. Sedighi is also the very first sociologist in Iran. And his PhD thesis still relevant.

"Thirty Years' War" of 17th century, in central Europe, is an exemplar of religious sectarian violence, resulting in 8 million casualties.
The current "Thirty Years' War" in our region has been an ugly start for 21st century.
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