Top   /  New
said Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
I appreciate you taking the time to share Marco; thank you. At face value I think #7 would resonate more (for me) if the verbiage was slightly revised. I will give this more thought and if something clicks, will share it on this thread.

That said, I really feel where you are coming from with your explanation. I am admittedly on social media more than usual of late, largely consuming international news of various global events. This spike of information and its inherently taxing nature (war, death, oppression, hunger, human rights, etc.). has adversely affected my balance and energy.

We're so consumed with our phones these days that we lack presence (thus dimming our essence/light). By design I am beginning to create phone-free zones for myself. I'm just 2 days into it but already feel better and more present. Heck, it even created a space for me to walk across the street and introduce myself to a neighbor I frequently wave to but have never taken the time to meet. I finally shook his hand and we ended up chatting for a good 20 minutes. Gotta say, it was more rewarding than any article or status update I've read this past week.

(side note re: the delay in your comments being posted: so as to prevent spamming, we re reviewed manually)

See More
1 +
said Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
I love this - thanks for sharing Marco! We also have a topic called +Self-Empowerment where future related posts could live. I found #5 ('More concern about all who are alive, not just a few') to be really interesting. I immediately thought of those who care about human rights, but selectively apply their level of care/love to just one cause, or group of people.

#7 was interesting as well -- I feel that I get the spirit behind it, but would love to hear you elaborate a bit on this one.
See More
13 +
ashianeh ashianeh (@ashianeh) on Pinned comment
Well-said! No doubt about it. Thanks for sharing!
See More
4 +
said Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
Nice list. I actually fact-checked that there is in fact a 'Donald Duck Day.' There is and it's today! *lol*
See More
0 +
MashGhasem MashGhasem (@MashGhasem) replied to Parsa (@Parsa) on Pinned comment
گفتا من آن ترنجم کاندر جهان نگنجم



گفتا تو از کجائی کاشفته می‌نمائی
گفتم منم غریبی از شهر آشنائی

گفتا سر چه داری کز سر خبر نداری
گفتم بر آستانت دارم سر گدائی

گفتا کدام مرغی کز این مقام خوانی
گفتم که خوش نوائی از باغ بینوائی

گفتا ز قید هستی رو مست شو که رستی
گفتم بمی پرستی جستم ز خود رهائی

گفتا جویی نیرزی گر زهد و توبه ورزی
گفتم که توبه کردم از زهد و پارسائی

گفتا بدلربائی ما را چگونه دیدی
گفتم چو خرمنی گل در بزم دلربائی

گفتا من آن ترنجم کاندر جهان نگنجم
گفتم به از ترنجی لیکن بدست نائی

گفتا چرا چو ذره با مهر عشق بازی
گفتم از آنکه هستم سرگشته‌ئی هوائی

گفتا بگو که خواجو در چشم ما چه بیند
گفتم حدیث مستان سری بود خدائی
See More
5 +
Parsa Parsa (@Parsa) replied to MashGhasem (@MashGhasem) on Pinned comment
An interesting entry in Wikipedia:

The word orange derives from the Sanskrit word for "orange tree" (नारङ्ग nāraṅga), which in turn derives from a Dravidian root word (from நரந்தம் narandam which refers to Bitter orange in Tamil).[24] The Sanskrit word reached European languages through Persian نارنگ (nārang) and its Arabic derivative نارنج (nāranj).

The word entered Late Middle English in the fourteenth century via Old French orenge (in the phrase pomme d'orenge).[25] The French word, in turn, comes from Old Provençal auranja, based on Arabic nāranj.[24] In several languages, the initial n present in earlier forms of the word dropped off because it may have been mistaken as part of an indefinite article ending in an n sound—in French, for example, une norenge may have been heard as une orenge. This linguistic change is called juncture loss. The color was named after the fruit,[26] and the first recorded use of orange as a color name in English was in 1512.[27][28]
A closeup of an orange blossom.

As Portuguese merchants were presumably the first to introduce the sweet orange to some regions of Europe, in several modern Indo-European languages the fruit has been named after them. Some examples are Albanian portokall, Bulgarian портокал (portokal), Greek πορτοκάλι (portokali), Macedonian portokal, Persian پرتقال (porteghal), Turkish portakal and Romanian portocală.[29][30] Related names can be found in other languages, such as Arabic البرتقال (bourtouqal), Georgian ფორთოხალი (pʰortʰoxali), Turkish portakal and Amharic birtukan.[29] Also, in some of the Italian regional languages (e.g. Neapolitan), an orange is portogallo or purtuallo, literally "(the) Portuguese (one)", in contrast to the Italian arancia.
See More
2 +
MashGhasem MashGhasem (@MashGhasem) replied to Parsa (@Parsa) on Pinned comment
Cesaria Evora - Angola





Sodade








See More
2 +
MashGhasem MashGhasem (@MashGhasem) on Pinned comment
Fascinating information about Iranian-Portuguese interactions. Very new to me. Emphasis on not getting stuck on the past, but only learning from past mistakes & moving on is crucial for us, especially now.
I've always wondered how and when did we start to call Orange "Portoghal" in Persian? And if this naming was in any way connected to Portugal?!
See More
0 +
Parsa Parsa (@Parsa) on Pinned comment
See More
3 +
ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) replied to varjavand (@varjavand) on Pinned comment
You're correct in pointing out the specific contingencies of the 2008 crisis, but my point was to highlight the structural reasons and explanations for the 2008 crisis, which could happen again and again until and unless those structural deficiencies are remedied and done away with.
Many of the financial, fiduciary safeguards that were supposedly put into place after 2008 to prevent another crisis are by this time practically nonexistent.
Risk taking by big financial institutions are still prevalent (since they end up in incredibly big profits) and governmental regulatory agencies and the financial institutions which they supposedly supervise are essentially one and the same, i.e. Goldman Sachs runs the whole show!
In order to explain all this we need to name the system, which is Capitalism.
And Capitalism is a system prone to crisis and humongously large scale damages to all as we saw in 2008, and might very well see it happening again either this year, or the next.

The Big Short

See More
0 +
varjavand varjavand (@varjavand) replied to ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
Remember financial crisis was the result of deceitful practices by greedy people who took advantage of the vulnerability of many investors. Regulatory forbearance was also partially responsible, Government did not do its job since it was too bust with so called War to Terrorism.
See More
1 +
ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) replied to varjavand (@varjavand) on Pinned comment
While GDP is a mostly accurate calculation and assessment of the aggregate economic activities in each nation state (somehow the Informal sector's contributions are never calculated into the official GDP numbers) it's not a good indicator of how the wealth of a nation is distributed, or how to remedy such an unequal or dysfunctional distribution.
For instance while Obama's administration did its best to improve the US economy (despite all the Republican sabotage and recalcitrance) and according to all scientifically valid data American GDP did improve from 2008 up to 2014, yet many hard hit areas in the US midwest still have not recovered from the 2008 crisis, which meant that economic recovery from 2008 was mainly a coastal phenomenon, leaving the rest of the nation intact (this lack of recovery in rural areas was also a plus for Trump's campaign).
Another example is how according to official statistics in Islamic Republic there has been 2 to 3 percent increase in the GDP, yet last month we witnessed nationwide protests against economic hardship, most prominently in smaller cities and towns in Iran.
Last but not least, there are also alternative methods of measuring the national accounts, which bypasses the mainstream economic tools and standards and offer a different macro view all together.



Measuring the Wealth of Nations: The Political Economy of National Accounts

This book provides an alternate foundation for the measurement of the production of nations, and applies it to the U.S. economy for the postwar period. The patterns that result are significantly different from those derived within conventional systems of national accounts. Conventional national accounts seriously distort basic economic aggregates, because they classify military, bureaucratic and financial activities as the creation of new wealth, when in fact they should be classified as forms of social consumption that, like personal consumption, actually use up social wealth in the performance of their functions.

www.researchgate.net/profile/Anwar_Shaikh3/publication/227389586_Measuring_the_Wealth_of_Nations/links/5412f64e0cf2788c4b3589ca/Measuring-the-Wealth-of-Nations.pdf


See More
0 +
ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) replied to varjavand (@varjavand) on Pinned comment
Some historians would argue that The Market System's ultimate "corrective" measures are world wars (of which we've had two already, and possibly a third one on the way).
Crony Capitalism has been an often cited issue in the past few decades, especially after the 2008 crisis. It's beyond irony how the US is now being "led" by an individual who has had six bankruptcies under his belt. But the problems is much bigger and more substantial than just some political contingencies concerning Trump and his ilke. The structural problems which currently threaten the entire world economy, which led to 2008 crisis (and there are again immense possibilities of it happening again) stem from the dominance of Finance Capital, and the big banks, which are too big to fail.

See More
0 +
ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) replied to varjavand (@varjavand) on Pinned comment
I know, it's hard to believe. I had the same initial reaction as you (and probably everyone who hears this story). The culprit for this family's financial ruin was a combination of credit card debt, hospital bills and cut work hours, which pushed them to declare bankruptcy.

What Living On $100,000 A Year Looks Like
www.npr.org/2017/12/03/567602293/what-living-on-100-000-a-year-looks-like

Per the issue of personal endowment of resources, obviously you have a valid point. But as you're probably also aware of, in the past decade or so this whole enterprise of Higher Education which has always been a path for higher social mobility, has turned into anything but, making this generation of Americans the first generation since 1920's to earn less and have lower social mobility than their parents (forcing many of them to return home, living with their parents). Also turning the aggregate students' loan in the US into something bordering or exceeding a trillion dollars, leaving many graduates to end up as middle managers in chain stores and such, barely making $40,000 to $50,000 a year, if they're REALLY lucky.
As you point out "complete equality is (not) a necessary condition to economic growth." But a drastic, prolonged lack of social mobility is a sure precondition for social unrest, and a source of renewed appeal for alternatives to Capitalism.
No wonder Bernie Sanders politics of Democratic Socialism has had such a deep and extensive appeal with the millenials. See below:

Why are there suddenly millions of socialists in America?
It used to be a dirty word. Bernie Sanders helped remove the stigma – but it’s the spectacular failure of capitalism that has really changed people’s minds

www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/feb/29/why-are-there-suddenly-millions-of-socialists-in-america
See More
1 +
varjavand varjavand (@varjavand) replied to ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
We don’t judge the performance of an economy by looking at just one indicators. While as you pointed out duly, the stock market has lost its meaning and its connection to the main street, it is still important since many Americans are indirectly impacted by its performance. GDP is a different story, it is the most comprehensive measure of a country’s economic performance and as you know US is by far the leader when it comes to the value of its GDP, nearly $20 trillion, 22.5% of the world’s output with 4% of the world’s population. China is distance second with about $9 trillion and about 20% of the world’s population.
See More
1 +
varjavand varjavand (@varjavand) replied to ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
Yes, market system is not perfect, it is often misused, exploited and derailed from its normal functioning by greedy people who seek to take advantage of vulnerability of consumers. However, these instances are rare and do not constitute an excuse to reject the system. The shortcomings, are mostly temporary and will be corrected by the forces of market coupled with prudent government policies. I believe, the “invisible hands” of the market still work especially in the long run.
Also notice that the difference between entrepreneurs in the US and in many other countries is that almost all the successful ones in the US did not gain their way up through cronyism, they did it through hard work, creativity, and efficiency. Market forces reward the efficient entrepreneurs and punish the ones who cannot compete because of inefficient operation. Big companies like Amazon, Microsoft, and Apple, were not that big from the beginning. They have evolved into the giant firms that they are today, during many decades of successful operation and good business acumen.
See More
0 +
varjavand varjavand (@varjavand) replied to ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
I don’t believe the report NPR is accurate, $100,000 is twice the national average. $100,000 is more than enough for a typical American family to achieve a decent level of living unless expectations are overly inflated which is a different story. Also, you may consider that fact that shortage/ deficiency or abundance are relative concepts. While $100,000 may be considered not a huge amount of money in the US, it is good enough to support a family in a poor country for two or three years.
Inequality is the automatic outcome of a free enterprise system in which income and wealth are distributed according to personal endowment of resources, do you expect a trained physician or certain hard working talented individuals earn the same as a high school drop out?
The distribution of income and wealth is very important for many reasons. However, there is no valid research indicating that complete equality is a necessary condition to economic growth .
See More
1 +
ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
Besides civic & personal advantages of sigining up as a volunteer, there are also political dimensions & traditions associated with volunteers.
Volunteering has been essential & most significant even for some political movements; for instance the proud tradition of Irish Republicanism could not have existed without the volunteers. Perhaps Bobby Sands is the most famous Irish Republican volunteer. We have a street named after him in Tehran, right next to Brits embassy!
See More
1 +
varjavand varjavand (@varjavand) replied to ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
Thanks for your insightful observations, I am waiting to watch the State of the Union Address which starts in about 10 minutes. , and will respond to your concerns soon, possibly tomorrow morning
See More
2 +
ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
Last but not least, White Supremacy and Racism are perhaps the biggest reasons why Trump is where he is right now, closely followed by mainstream corporate media’s free ride to him and the antiquated, reactionary electoral procedure of Electoral College.

As that old Persian proverb says:
"از ماست که بر ماست!"
See More
0 +