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ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) replied to Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
Thanx for your comment and kind words.
In contrast to mainstream/corporate pedagogy in an alternative, democratic pedagogy the emphasis is on the relational nature of learning and how the instructor herself is as much a student as others in the classroom.

"A Pedagogy of the Oppressed" has been the central text for past half century in the field of emancipatory pedagogy.
PEDAGOGY OF THE OPPRESSED – WHAT IS IT AND WHY ITS STILL RELEVANT.
www.practicingfreedom.org/pedagogy-of-the-oppressed-what-is-it-and-why-its-still-relevant/

Talking about alternative approaches in Silicon valley startups, a few weeks back I was leafing through this book on the same topic and it leaves the readers with an unburnished view of it all.
Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley
knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/chaos-monkeys-startup-founders-silicon-valley-tell/
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said Saïd Amin (@said) replied to ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) on Pinned comment
Great point and picture!

As you may know, in tech culture we strongly encourage startups to innovate & 'disrupt' inefficient industries. When successful in doing so, we laud the founders/company (AirBnB, Amazon, SpaceX, etc.). Founders, employees and their investors get rich(er), the media shower praise and society's reward is a product or service that is either new or superior to its predecessor(s). The startup world encourages critical thinking in a way that (as you pointed out) the educational system does not; and that's too bad. If mindfulness/critical thinking were formally included in our educational system, individuals and society at large would greatly benefit from it. Sadly, this is one of the last things most governments want -- an awakened population of critical thinkers willing to challenge the status-quo and 'business as usual' approach.
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ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) replied to Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
There's also the most important issue of the entire educational system and pedagogical techniques which the article never mentions.
When an educational system is basically tasked with preparing workers for a job market bent on homogenization, commodification, consensus and conformity, of course issues related to abstract thought and critical thinking won't be central to its pedagogy.
An emancipated society not based on commodification will certainly put a premium on teaching values, methods and perspective related to critical thinking and philosophical thoughts.

"The sleep of reason produces monsters"
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john John Skorick (@john) replied to Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
There was so much outcry when this change was rumored that I'm a bit surprised they went through with it.

I never wear headphones but just saw this; perhaps it's of use.

gizmodo.com/an-insanely-long-list-of-ways-to-deal-with-the-iphone-h-1786067822
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said Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
What a worthwhile topic to explore/contemplate. Prior to reading it, my mind was racing in so many directions -- the article helped center me.

Contrary to what the author suggests, I don't think that technology is to blame, nor is the media (mainstream or social), for our growing lack of critical thinking. The culprit lies in chosen behaviors, like surrendering to your path of least resistance -- a path of conformity that is void of mindfulness.

The article is a reminder that my own critical thinking is a skill; a skill that needs repetition and practice. I'm reminded to...

- resist the urge to amplify.

- regurgitate someone else’s thoughts and ideas that I may, or may not agree with.

- challenge assumptions -- my own and those of other people.

- check for my bias(es).

- harness/grow my own critical thinking skills and consider alternatives.
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said Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
"Goodbye headset jacks, hello wireless headphones."

Mumble. Tangled headphone wires are certainly a pain the ass, but it's something I can live with. My biggest gripe with this change is that I often damage my iphone headphones by putting them through the washer/dryer and carelessly lose them when out and about. As a result I probably go through 5+ Apple EarPods a year ($29.00 a pair). The new AirPods (EarPods without wires) are going to cost me significantly more -- $149 a pop! Suffice it to say I'm not thrilled about this change, but the silver lining is that the price hike will (hopefully) make me less careless with my headphones.
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SaitouKatsu SaitouKatsu (@SaitouKatsu) on Pinned comment
The rocket explosion didn't destroy the satellite. It's destruction came moments after it fell to the ground, when the satellite itself exploded inside the payload fairing. Rocket science is hard, but the ground is even harder.
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FitFanatic FitFanatic (@FitFanatic) on Pinned comment
Spectacular explosion. The aftermath: a conversation between Zuck and Elon Musk.
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ChamoshChamoshvnd ChamoshChamoshvnd (@ChamoshChamoshvnd) replied to dohelzen (@dohelzen) on Pinned comment
Actually any concise and correct translation of "Daesh" should include Mullahs of Iran as the Original Daesh and ISIS.
All theocracies are doomed; whether Islamic theocracies like Saudis or our own 'beloved' Islamic Republic of Hell or Jewish theocracy like Israel.
Talking about doomed, remember how that White Polar Bear got it rear behind kicked in Afghanistan? Looks like it is on the course for another round of getting kicked on its rear behind in Syrian. Count on it.
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dohelzen dohelzen (@dohelzen) on Pinned comment
Ha ha . Of course the translation half right but the concise and correct translation of ‘Daesh’ is Israel .
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john John Skorick (@john) on Pinned comment
Well said!
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Veronexim Veronexim (@Veronexim) on Pinned comment
It's a great system for the Gov/Apple.
They get tons of crowd sourced pentesting, and have to pay only for findings they deem serious enough. One time payments vs having an auditor on payroll or paying a 3rd party.
They save a truck load on costs.
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FitFanatic FitFanatic (@FitFanatic) on Pinned comment
at first I was skeptical of this posts claim that Fiverr is knowingly allowing scams, but a quick Google search of "fiverr complaints" fetches a fair share of fraud claims including this, "After undercover sting, Amazon files suit against 1,000 Fiverr users over fake product reviews" goo.gl/Pm6TRC

While Fiverr may of not been complicit in this ring of fraud, it's their platform and they're responsible for ensuring that it's not abused to scam people. Thanks for the post. I will likely never use their service.
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luckyasp luckyasp (@luckyasp) on Pinned comment
This really needs to get posted in more places.
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Savodi Savodi (@Savodi) replied to Healthy (@Healthy) on Pinned comment
It does. That marketplace is indeed a scam in itself. The owners are Israeli and they've decided to put making money above anything else.
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Healthy Healthy (@Healthy) on Pinned comment
My first post! Hopefully it helps a few people.
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Akako Akako (@Akako) replied to Statik (@Statik) on Pinned comment
:) As though my regular vacuum is not terrifying enough for my dog.
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Statik Statik (@Statik) on Pinned comment
Fun idea. So basically if you get a robotic vacuum cleaner, you can have endless fun by seeing your dog tormented. :))
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john John Skorick (@john) replied to Mike (@MikeBoogey) on Pinned comment
It should have a huge negative impact on their valuation. I'm sure you recall most of their recent rounds were raised specifically to capture the Chinese market.

Big loss for Uber.
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MikeBoogey Mike (@MikeBoogey) on Pinned comment
The company was losing BILLIONS for a market that most analysts said all-along that Uber could never win. I wonder if bowing out of China, the largest ride-sharing market by far, affects their 62 Billion dollar valuation.
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