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said Saïd Amin (@said) on Pinned comment
Switching gears a bit, but what about shaming dogs? I found it interesting to learn that animal behaviorists say dogs lack the ability to feel shame altogether. News to me. But wait, what about Flex's anxious/sad reaction to my serious but somewhat goofy glare when he misbehaved?

From a TIME article (goo.gl/9icrs7):

"In one 2009 study that sought to examine the so-called “guilty dog look,” dogs were videotaped as their owners instructed them not to eat a treat then left the room. Some dogs succumbed to temptation and some didn’t, some owners knew and some didn’t, but “the look” was strongly tied to the owner’s actions—not the dog’s.

“I found that the ‘look’ appeared most often when owners scolded their dogs, regardless of whether the dog had disobeyed or did something for which they might or should feel guilty,” Alexandra Horowitz, who conducted the study and wrote Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know, told the AP. “It wasn’t ‘guilt’ but a reaction to the owner that prompted the look."
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ashianeh ashianeh (@ashianeh) on Pinned comment
Heart warming and inspiring!
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iraj iraj (@iraj) on Pinned comment
"They stop crying when they realize no one is coming for them. Not in 10 minutes, not in 4 hours, and maybe, perhaps, not ever…”
Wanted to say many things but at the end left me speechless.
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Baller Baller (@Baller) on Pinned comment
This is the first ever positive article I've read on this topic. As a black father I'm heartened to see such an article in popular media.
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FitFanatic FitFanatic (@FitFanatic) on Pinned comment
"Offering children tangible rewards in exchange for caring behavior can erode their innate tendency to help others."

It can also result in children who view every action or request of them as a negotiation, leveraging their potential cooperation, or lack-thereof, as a means to extract more rewards out of people. This would certainly not float with my family.
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